close

How can we help?

We might not have all the answers but we welcome all questions. Please reach out to us with media inquiries, questions about membership or non-political partnership, ideas or requests. We look forward to hearing from you in any of the official Swiss languages or English.

How can we help? EN
I hereby confirm that I have read and agree with the privacy policy. *

Become a Member or non-political partner.

Do you have any further questions around becoming a digitalswitzerland member or a non-political partner of our foundation? We are happy to have a conversation with you about our offerings.

Become a member or partner EN
I hereby confirm that I have read and agree with the privacy policy. *

close

Newsletter

Get the latest digital thinking direct to your inbox. Join more than 14,000 fellow digital enthusiasts for our regular round-up of the latest news, project updates and ideas to inspire.

Newsletter icon
close

Download document

After subscribing to our newsletter you can download the document.

Newsletter icon

Embracing the Future: Key Takeaways from the Digital Identity unConference Europe

From 18th – 20th June, the Digital Identity unConference Europe (DICE) took part in Zurich. It served as a magnifying glass to the world of digital identities, revealing insights and collaborative efforts across various states, industries and communities.

Swiss E-ID: Addressing the Elephant in the Room

The first day of the unConference contained inputs from representatives in government, business and technology. In a highly anticipated opening statement Federal Councillor Beat Jans, the ‘elephant in the room’ got addressed right away: When and in what form will the E-ID and the associated trust infrastructure  be ready? Mr. Jans clarified the projected timeline and the expected form of the new E-ID infrastructure in Switzerland, as the Swiss parliament is set to pass the necessary legislation in the upcoming fall. The Federal administration envisions a multi-stack approach, relying on different technologies in order to ensure optimal security as well as interoperability. The Federal Councillor’s insights built on the previous rejection of an E-ID project by Swiss voters in 2021. As a consequence, Mr. Jans emphasised that the revised approach aimed to be more transparent and secure, incorporating feedback from various stakeholders to ensure broader acceptance. 

Global Perspectives: E-ID Approaches in Different States and Cultures

Additionally, the first day of the DICE set the Swiss E-ID project in an international context: Discussions explored how other countries are navigating the challenges and opportunities of digital identity systems, highlighting the diverse approaches to E-ID implementations across different regions of the world. From the EU’s eIDAS framework to the US government’s E-ID projects, the discussions underscored the importance of considering cultural and legal differences as well as the challenges regarding interoperability that lie ahead. Interoperability between different E-ID systems holds the premise of  a seamless user experience and broader acceptance, yet it remains a challenging frontier. Various panellists emphasised the need for a steady and well-structured approach when it comes ensuring interoperability.

The unConference format: A Hub for Collaborative Learning

For the remaining days of DICE,the traditional conference format was abandoned. Instead, the unConference format fostered an open, participatory environment where every attendee could contribute and set up their own sessions to discuss a specific topic. This dynamic setup allowed for a fluid exchange of ideas and projects, making it an ideal setting for tackling the multifaceted issues of digital identity.

User Acceptance

A recurring theme was the critical need for trust to achieve broader user acceptance, which was illustrated by discussions surrounding the implementation of the EU identity wallet system. Practical user experience focuses on making interfaces user-friendly and straightforward, with feedback loops to refine the system. Experts pointed to the importance of the wallet’s contextual relevance, accessibility to a vast amount of users, and ability to protect sensitive data. Industry standards can thereby influence its functionalities, while guardianship mechanisms should ensure that users’ rights and data are protected. The recovery process was mentioned as a vital aspect, as it must be robust and user-friendly to mitigate data loss risks and reinforce user trust in the system. By enhancing these aspects, the EU aims to create a digital identity wallet that is not only technologically robust but also widely accepted and used by the public.

Organisational Identity

The concept of organisational identity emerged as a more recent effort within the digital identity sphere. Organisational identity addresses how companies and organisations maintain their unique digital presence securely and consistently in a digital space. As organisations increasingly interact with various digital ecosystems — be it for regulatory compliance, customer engagement, or internal operations — the need for a coherent and secure organisational digital identity becomes paramount. Such an identity thereby encapsulates the organisation’s core attributes, such as its business type, industry standards, and operational roles, ensuring that all transactions and interactions are traceable and verifiable. Additionally, as organisations undergo digital transformations, maintaining a consistent identity across multiple platforms and services is essential to prevent fraud and enhance operational efficiency. Implementing strong authentication and authorization mechanisms can help organisations mitigate risks and enhance trust with partners and customers. 

Quantum Resilience

With quantum computing on the horizon, the unConference also touched upon the need for quantum-resistant digital identities. As quantum computers become more and more powerful in future, they could potentially break many of the cryptographic protocols that current digital identity systems rely on. The digital identity community is increasingly focused on developing quantum-resistant cryptography methods to ensure that digital identities remain secure even as the landscape of computing evolves. The challenge lies not only in developing these new cryptographic standards but also in integrating them into existing digital systems in a way that is seamless and transparent to users. This proactive approach in anticipating quantum resilience will play a vital role in maintaining the long-term security and viability of digital identity systems, safeguarding user data against future technological disruptions and ensuring that the digital identity ecosystem can withstand the next wave of upcoming computing advancements.

The Digital Identity unConference Europe was an innovative and collaborative  ground for sowing the seeds and growing solutions of future digital identity frameworks and technologies. The discussions and insights provided not only a snapshot of current challenges and innovations but also a vision for the path forward — a path characterised by inclusivity, security, and adaptability to future technological shifts.

Study on the cybersecurity of Swiss internet users in 2023

A representative survey of over 1,200 people in Switzerland between August and September provided important insights into attitudes and behaviour towards cyber risks. The study shows that hacking and cyberattacks are becoming increasingly clever and frequent. The average household already has seven devices connected online that are potential targets, and this number is expected to rise. Employers play an important role in raising awareness, but this measure does not reach the most affected age group (65+) sufficiently. This group tends to rely on traditional media and their personal environment. Although 86% of respondents feel safe online and 68% rate their skills as good, 31% use the same password for almost all online services. The most common consequences of cyberattacks are financial losses, data loss and violations of personal rights.

The survey was carried out on behalf of the Swiss Mobiliar Insurance Company Ltd, digitalswitzerland, Allianz Digitale Sicherheit Schweiz, the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland FHNW – Digital Transformation Competence Centre, the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences SATW and Swiss Internet Security Alliance (SISA).

Read the study in German.

Read the press release in German, French and Italian.

Read the press conference presentation in German.

To download the infographics of the study, please navigate to internet-sicherheit.ch.

Study on digitalisation and cybersecurity in SMEs 2023

8 out of 10 SMEs entrust their digital infrastructures to external IT service providers and also seek advice from them in the area of cybersecurity. However, there is hardly any progress in the implementation of measures to protect against cybercrime. The results of the latest study on digitalisation and cybersecurity in SMEs make it clear: the more companies identify themselves as digital pioneers, the more often they implement technical and organisational measures to strengthen cybersecurity in their company. However, while in previous years around one fifth of the SMEs surveyed always saw themselves as digital pioneers, in 2023 this figure is only around one tenth.

The survey was carried out on behalf of the Swiss Mobiliar Insurance Company Ltd, digitalswitzerland, Allianz Digitale Sicherheit Schweiz, the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland FHNW – Digital Transformation Competence Centre and the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences SATW.

Read the study in German. For further analysis, read the Whitepaper in German, French and Italian.

Read the press release in German, French and Italian.

Read the press conference presentation in German.

Study on digitalisation and cybersecurity in SMEs 2022

With the propagated “end” of the pandemic, the flexibility of SMEs is also coming to an end. Primarily working from home has not become established, as the results of the latest study on digitalisation and cybersecurity in SMEs show. The situation is similar with cybersecurity: despite a strong presence in the media, the topic has a low priority among the companies surveyed. The implementation of organisational and technical measures to improve cybersecurity has also not increased. One third of the surveyed SMEs outsource their IT security to external service providers. The quality of the services offered is thus crucial for the security of small businesses in Switzerland.

The survey was carried out on behalf of the Swiss Mobiliar Insurance Company Ltd, digitalswitzerland, Allianz Digitale Sicherheit Schweiz, the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland FHNW – Digital Transformation Competence Centre and the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences SATW.

Read the study in German. For further analysis, read the Whitepaper in German, French and Italian.

Read the press release in German, French and Italian.

Read the press conference presentation in German.

In the summer session from 30 May to 17 June 2022, there are once again more than 50 items on the agenda relating to digital policy – many of them from the fields of e-government and cybersecurity.

The complete review is available in the national languages German and French.

With the cybero quick test, you will find out whether your company is sufficiently protected against cyber risks.

The risk of cyber attacks is strongly underestimated

36%
of Swiss SMEs have already been the victim of a cyber attack*.

15%
of Swiss SMEs consider the risk of being suspended for a day due to a cyber attack to be high or very high*.

56%
of SMEs consider the topic of cyber security to be important for their company.*

*Source: Home office and cyber security in Swiss SMEs (only in German) commissioned by Die Mobiliar, digitalswitzerland, FHNW Hochschule für Wirtschaft, SATW; conducted by gfs-zürich. November 2021

Cybersecurity Guide for SMEs

In addition to the SME CyberCheck, we have developed the Cybersecurity Guide for SMEs. This guide shows you practical recommendations and provides further information on the topic of cybersecurity.

SME CyberCheck

Important background information on the SME CyberCheck.

Why is a risk profile important when dealing with cyber risks?

With the SME CyberCheck, you create your own IT risk profile. This makes it easier for you to detect and better assess possible risks.

How do I act in view of the risks?

How do I ensure that my company does not fall victim to cybercrime?

Use the technical and organisational expertise of a CyberSeal-certified service provider to protect your company from cyber attacks.

Partner

The Cybersecurity quick check is supported by the following partners.

The reporting obligation is important, but still needs clarification

digitalswitzerland considers the introduction of a reporting obligation for operators of critical infrastructures in the event of cyber attacks to be an important and correct step. The Federal Council’s proposal still needs to be clarified in some points so that ambiguities can be avoided.

Read the media release in German or French.

The full statement is only available in German.

Media contact
Andreas W. Kaelin, digitalswitzerland, Office Bern
Phone +41 31 311 62 45 │ andreas@digitalswitzerland.com

Bern/Zurich, 18.03.2022 – In an increasingly digitalised society, cybersecurity has become a key issue. This is particularly true for the protection of critical infrastructures. The Federal Council wants to make improvements here and is therefore conducting a consultation on two legislative proposals at the same time. The submission deadline for the first, the targeted amendment to the Ordinance on Telecommunications Services (OTS) to protect telecommunications infrastructures and services, ends today. The digitalswitzerland association welcomes the revision and proposes individual adjustments for clear and efficient implementation.

Read the press release as web version in German (Download PDF) | in French (Download PDF)
To the complete statement on the Amendment of the Ordinance on Telecommunications Services (OTS) (available in German)

Contact for further information:
Andreas W. Kaelin, digitalswitzerland | Bern Office
Tel. +41 31 311 62 45 │ andreas@digitalswitzerland.com